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Classic Actress: Simone Signoret


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Simone SignoretBorn in Wiesbaden during the French occupation after the First World War, the daughter of a French officer, Simone Signoretspent her childhood in Brittany. After the baccalaureate, they wanted to study law.

Her father, a Polish Jew who fled in 1940 with his family before the German troops to London. But they returned later the same year and took back to Paris, as they would have been regarded as a half-Jewish, the maiden name of her mother. For the newspaper Le Petit Parisien, she worked as a secretary.

She brought with casual work, and later acting her mother and her two brothers alone through the war. In 1941 she received her first film role. In 1943, she married the film director Yves Allégret, formerly secretary of the Russian revolutionary Leon Trotsky was. With Allégret they had a daughter, Catherine (* 1946). In 1950, she divorced and married in 1951 in his second marriage to singer and actor Yves Montand.

Signoret played in many big films and won Best Actor Award at the 1959 Cannes Film Festival and the Oscar for best female lead in the way up. In 1978 she won the César for best actress in Madame Rosa (orig.: La vie devant soi). Click here embodied a former prostitute who runs a nursery school in a rented house for the abandoned children of prostitutes. Signoret was also successful in the theater, especially on the side of Yves Montand in The Crucible (1955) and Macbeth (1966) at the Royal Court Theater in London.

Common grave of Simone Signoret and Yves Montand in the Pere Lachaise

She became famous through her fearless political engagement. In 1950, they signed together with the Stockholm Declaration Montand (Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons) and subsequently received travel ban to the U.S.. She protested publicly against the invasion of the Soviet Union in Hungary, the French war in Algeria, the Franco-committed regime and at workers' strikes. In 1980 she played in Munich theater for the Political Action Charter 77.

She died in 1985 at the consequences of a cancer disease and was buried in the cemetery Pere Lachaise in Paris, where was buried six years later her husband. A few years before her death seemed to her acclaimed novel, Adieu Volodya.

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